Category: 05_2024_2

Rabbi and Rebbetzin Corner May 2024

Rabbi and Rebbetzin Corner May 2024

By Eric Carlson in 05_2024_2, newsletter-post on May 1, 2024

Shalom Mishpocha,

May has arrived! Our gardens and flowers are growing, and the temperatures continue to warm! May is likely named after the Roman goddess Maia in Latin, who oversaw the growth of plants. May is a busy month as we prepare for summer and school is finishing up! May 5th is Cinco de Mayo “The Fifth of May” in Spanish. This day celebrates the victory of the Mexican army over the French army at The Battle of Puebla in 1862.

Sunday, May 12th is Mother’s Day, mark your calendar, don’t forget! Mothers are the most honored women in the Bible. Great emphasis is laid upon the influence of mothers. The word “mother” or “mothers” appears in the Bible almost 300 times. The word “mother-in-law” appears 11 times and is always in reference to Naomi, mother-in-law of Ruth. The bibles great emphasis on the importance and influence of mothers is revealed in:

Ezekiel 16:44. Everyone who quotes proverbs will quote this proverb against you, “Like mother, like daughter.”

Love of children is deeply engraved into the hearts of Biblical women. The term mother is given and regarded with the deepest reverence. Mothers carry the gift of life! The flame of life which is the lamp of the Lord according to Prov 20:27, the “Nemesha” (soul in Hebrew) is divinely placed within the baby inside the mother’s womb, the cradle of life. Thereby woman are the keepers of the light! So many lives have been influenced and saved through the prayers of Mothers and Grandmothers.

Scripture speaks highly of mothers who raise their children and influence their families in a righteous manner; in the oft-quoted Proverbs 31, the “wife of noble character” is honored by her husband and children for her virtues.

As the spiritual light keeper, mothers have been given the privilege of ushering in the holy Shabbat by lighting the candles on Erev Shabbat, Friday evening, ushering in the brightness, the illumination of the Word of God into the home filling it with Shalom, peace, and harmony. Also, the Shabbat Candles are traditionally lit by the women because it was a woman who removed the light from the world (Eve) and it was a woman who returned the light to the world Miriam (Mary) who gave birth to Yeshua. It’s because of this understanding that in a Jewish or biblical home, the wife and mother is called “akeret Habayit” in Hebrew which means the “mainstay” or “keeper” of the home. It’s the mother who, for the most part, determines the character and atmosphere of the entire home.

It’s this character and atmosphere that makes a Biblical household different from a non-Biblical home. A godly mother’s home is maintained, immersed, and kept according to Adonai’s commands, mitzvahs, and directives as outlined in the whole book! This establishes holiness and purity within the home making it an abode for Adonai’s Presence, a home of Godliness!

Monday, May 27th is Memorial Day, a US federal holiday wherein the men and women who died while serving in the United States Armed Forces are remembered. The holiday, which is celebrated every year on the final Monday of May, was formerly known as Decoration Day and originated after the American Civil War to commemorate the Union and Confederate soldiers who died in the Civil War. By the 20th century, Memorial Day had been extended to honor all Americans who have died while in the military service.

Memorial Day is the start of summer for some, time to picnic for others, a three-day weekend for all (remember to pray for no traffic fatalities in the Commonwealth of Virginia) but most importantly it is a day to remember those who have fallen for freedom, those who have given their lives, who have spilled their blood upon the roots of the of the Patriot Tree to defend and preserve this Republic and liberate oppressed people around the world! The “Patriot’s blood is the seed of Freedom’s tree” penned by Revolutionary War era poet Thomas Campbell pays tribute to the soldiers who fought in the American Revolutionary War with these words that serve as reminders for us today that we would not have the freedoms we hold dear were it not for the sacrifice of our country’s patriots.

What we remember—and honor—on Memorial Day is heroic sacrifice. We acknowledge those who nobly gave of themselves, even unto death, for a purpose they believed in was greater than themselves. Since the days following the end of the Civil War, Americans have gathered in late May to honor those who died in military service to their country. We remember those who have paid the ultimate sacrifice for freedom.

“Freedom is never more than one generation away from extinction. We didn’t pass it on to our children in the bloodstream. It must be fought for, protected, and handed on for them to do the same, or one day we will spend our sunset years telling our children and our children’s children what it was once like in the United States where men were free.” –President Ronald Reagan in an address to the annual meeting of the Phoenix Chamber of Commerce, (30 March 1961).

Then Tuesday, May 28th is Armed Forces Day, a day which honors those who serve in all branches of the United States military. Let us honor those on active duty!

Abba Father, Creator of heaven and earth, we give You all the praise, glory, and honor You are worthy of! We thank you for the blessing of the new month of May. We pray that you would experience Adonai’s joy, love, and shalom in abundance this month. May Adonai draw nearer to you as you draw nearer to Adonai in Yeshua’s name I pray!
Amen!

Blessings and Shalom,

Rabbi and Rebbetzin Carlson